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Fort Hood Renewable Energy Facilities Enter Commercial Operations

Killeen, Texas – The U.S. Army’s largest single renewable energy project began officially generating clean electricity on April 27.Apex Clean Energy (Apex) developed, managed construction of, and currently operates the groundbreaking hybrid wind and solar complex, which will provide more than 50 percent of the annual load at U.S. Army Garrison Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.

Apex and Northleaf Capital Partners (Northleaf) own the renewable energy portfolio of which the complex is a part: the 50.4 MW Cotton Plains Wind and 151.2 MW Old Settler Wind facilities in Floyd County, Texas; and the 15.4 MWac Phantom Solar on-site at Fort Hood.

The Defense Logistics Agency–Energy, on behalf of the Army, is purchasing the power from Cotton Plains Wind and Phantom Solar to supply energy to Fort Hood. The two facilities will save the Army—and taxpayers—an estimated $168 million in direct energy costs over the life of the project. Old Settler Wind, meanwhile, is generating enough clean electricity to power 51,000 average U.S. homes. Apex is providing asset management services for all three facilities.

“With our deep corporate ties to the military, Apex is honored to partner with the Army on its goals to increase our country’s energy independence and protect our national security,” said Mark Goodwin, president and CEO of Apex. “We are all proud to help Fort Hood ensure decades of consistent, affordable, and secure clean energy.”

“We are pleased to partner with Apex, given the company’s reputation as a leading renewable energy company,” said Jared Waldron, a director at Northleaf. “Direct investments in fully contracted wind and solar assets are consistent with Northleaf’s investment strategy and offer stable cash flows and attractive long-term returns for our investors.”

Apex and Northleaf arranged debt financing and tax equity commitments for the renewable portfolio. CohnReznick Capital served as financial adviser to Apex.

The U.S. Army and Apex Clean Energy will host a ribbon-cutting ceremony at Fort Hood on June 2 to commemorate the start of operations. More information will be provided as the date approaches.

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About Apex
Apex Clean Energy builds, owns, and operates utility-scale wind and solar power facilities. Apex was the U.S. market leader in 2015 and has brought nearly 1,700 MW online over the past two years.

With a team of over 200 professionals and the nation’s largest wind energy project pipeline, Apex is a leader in the transition to a clean energy future. For more information, visitwww.apexcleanenergy.com.

About Northleaf Capital Partners
Northleaf Capital Partners is a leading independent global private equity, infrastructure and private credit manager, with more than $9 billion in commitments under management on behalf of public, corporate and multi-employer pension plans, university endowments, foundations, financial institutions and family offices. Northleaf’s global infrastructure program pursues direct investments in mature, conservatively-positioned infrastructure assets in developed markets.

Northleaf’s 85-person team, located in Toronto, London, Chicago, and Menlo Park, is focused exclusively on sourcing, evaluating and managing private markets investments globally. Northleaf currently manages seven global private equity funds, two specialist private equity secondary funds, two infrastructure funds, a private credit fund and a series of customized investment mandates tailored to meet the specific needs of institutional investors and family offices. For more information on Northleaf, please visitwww.northleafcapital.com.

Natural Gas and Renewables, A Partnership With Which Coal Can’t Compete

By Jeffrey Clark
http://eecn.johnshopkins.edu/index.php/2016/11/15/1512/#ixzz4VtCXZCTF

In an ugly weekend for Texas football fans, the Longhorns were defeated by the West Virginia Mountaineers.  Sitting in the stadium, I reflected on our just-ended Presidential election in which energy issues – particularly the promise of a coal renaissance – played a major role.  I was struck by the bigger battle between these two states currently unfolding off the gridiron.  That competition is for the future of American electric power generation and, campaign rhetoric aside, it is one in which natural gas, wind, and solar from states like Texas and Oklahoma will resoundingly defeat the dirtier and increasingly more expensive coal from the mines of states like West Virginia.

Peaking in 2007 when it was used to generate half of the United States’ electric power, coal use has been declining steadily while the use of low-priced natural gas has been on the rise.  By 2015, coal’s share had fallen dramatically, with each fuel then providing about one-third of our nation’s power generation.  In coal country, this shift is often blamed on environmental policies, overregulation, and the growth of renewable energy.  In reality, the causes are more complicated.  While new regulations reducing harmful emissions from coal power plants have increased their cost of operations, the reduction in our use of coal is driven by economics, attributable primarily to the arrival of inexpensive and abundant natural gas.

Fuel switching by power generators is becoming common, with low natural gas prices the primary driving force.  A study by BTU Analytics concluded that natural gas priced near $2.50/MMBtu provides sufficient economic justification for shutting down coal plants and replacing them with newer gas generation.  This switching is also driven by the flexibility of natural gas generation, which allows it to work in concert with other low or no emission generators, especially renewables.

Unlike coal power plants which cannot be efficiently started and stopped, new gas generation units can ramp quickly, meaning that they can serve to balance generation fluctuations from variable generation resources like wind and solar.  A recent study published by the National Bureau of Economic Research found that a 1% rise in fast reacting natural gas generation was associated with a 0.88% rise in renewable generation.  The authors, analyzing data from 26 OECD countries, concluded “that renewables and fast-reacting fossil technologies appear as highly complementary and that they should be jointly installed to meet the goals of cutting emissions and ensuring a stable supply.”

That “highly complementary” relationship is a simple one. Natural gas power plants provide power with reduced emissions, high reliability, and some price volatility; while renewables offer emission-free, low cost, fixed-priced power with variability in generation output.  Married together, they offer high reliability, lower prices, moderate price stability, and reduced emissions.

There is irony in the fact that many of America’s most energy-rich states import the fuels currently essential to powering their lives and economies.  The symbiotic partnership between natural gas and renewables is helping these states, including Texas, break their addiction to imported coal bringing wide-ranging economic benefits including energy independence, consumer savings on power, emissions reductions, rural economic development, and new tax revenue for governments and schools.

President-Elect Donald J. Trump has promised much to energy producers, leaving constituencies in the natural gas and coal producing communities hoping that their fortunes are about to rise.  But, unlike the annual battle that plays out on the football field, the contest between West Virginia coal and Texas natural gas is already in the fourth quarter and fans are walking out of the stadium.  Coal is not clean enough, affordable enough, or flexible enough to compete in the clean energy market of the future.  Instead, the future will be dominated by a new group of states harnessing new technologies, their infinite renewable energy resources, and their vast supplies of cleaner-burning natural gas.

Other Reading:

How Renewables Can Save Natural Gas – Bloomberg